Tiger Beer Wants to Make You NOT FORGET the Importance of Your Hawker Uncles and Aunties

Posted on Sep 5 2016 - 7:36pm by Redwire Singapore

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Following a successful run in April, Tiger Beer is bringing back their street food movement to celebrate Singapore’s street food culture.

Through a series of hawker food-centric initiatives, the campaign aims to bring Singaporeans together and encourage them to appreciate and show gratitude to the hardworking hawkers behind their beloved dishes.

From watching behind-the-scenes films about hawkers to sharing your favourite dishes on social media, here are four ways that you can take part in this celebration of all things local.

1. Understanding the craft through film

A sizzling plate of char kway teow or fried carrot cake from your local hawker might seem effortless to prepare, but what goes unseen are the countless years of sacrifice, practice and perfection of the craft in order to achieve that consistent distinctive taste.

Take a closer look at the hard work and emotional highs and lows behind the scenes through short films commissioned by Tiger Beer, such as  Cambridge Rd. Hong Kong Roast Pork.

The film features Mdm Wong Li Er, who gives out food coupons to the elderly twice a month for them to redeem meals at her food stall. In the film, Mdm Wong explains that she might be an uneducated stall owner, but she can also give back to her community by offering her food to the less fortunate.

Tiger Street Food – Cambridge Rd. Hong Kong Roast Pork

By commissioning films that feature the personal journeys of real-life hawkers, Tiger Beer hopes to give Singaporeans a glimpse into hawkers’ personal lives and how much effort and dedication they have put into their craft.

The films aim to deepen Singaporeans’ appreciation for street food and encourage them to show gratitude to their favourite hawkers.

2. Hawker dining events with a difference

Beginning September 14, Singaporeans can look forward to five weekly street food dining events at select coffeeshops all over the island, where they get a chance to enjoy dinner on Tiger Beer.

It’s not just about eating, however. These dining events feature an interactive component where diners can be part of the street food movement by sharing their favourite street food experiences and ‘thank you’ messages on social media, using the hashtag #uncagestreetfood.

3. Limited-edition local flavours

Those unable to make it to the hawker dining events can still be part of the street food movement right at home.

Tiger Beer has collaborated with local snacks brand Camel to create Nasi Lemak Sambal Flavoured Nuts – so you can pair the distinctive flavour of nasi lemak with your beer.

Consumers will receive a packet of the limited edition Nasi Lemak Sambal Flavoured Nuts with purchase of two 500ml cans of Tiger Beer (2 x 500ml) from August 1 to September 30 at select convenience stores.

The Nasi Lemak Sambal Flavoured Nuts will also be available with purchase of three pints of draught beer or a bucket of Tiger Beer from September 1 to October 31 at select bars and pubs.

4. Fuelling the next generation of hawkers

Last but not least, Tiger Beer’s inaugural Tiger Street Food Support Fund will put money in the hands of the next generation of hawkers, encouraging Singaporeans to pursue their dreams and keep local food traditions alive.

Open to hawkers who have set up a cooked local food stall in a hawker centre or coffee shop within the last three months, or who are entering the trade for the first time (as of August 15, 2016), this fund offers successful applicants up to $10,000 in reimbursements.

The fund can be used to offset costs for any aspect of the hawkers’ businesses except for rental costs.

The open call for applications runs until November 15, after which up to 30 applicants will be selected to receive funding. The lucky recipients will be announced in January next year.

Through this fund, Tiger Beer hopes to support aspiring local hawkers and invest in Singapore’s street food culture for the years to come. After all, great Singaporean food is not just about the dishes – it is also about the people.

 

 

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