Parents Complain about Ridiculously Difficult PSLE Listening Comprehension Question

Posted on Sep 21 2017 - 6:22pm by Redwire Singapore

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Okay parents of Primary 6 students whose kids haven’t complained to you about a seemingly “ridiculous” Chinese listening comprehension question test…

See if you can answer this:

Student A is wearing new clothes.
Student B asks Student A: “Did you buy new clothes?”
Student A replies: “No, I didn’t buy them. My mother sewed them for me herself. Are they nice?”
Student B says: “They’re very nice, I didn’t know your mother could sew clothes!”

Now the question is: What did Student A reply?

1. My mother sews clothes for me when she has free time
2. My mother doesn’t like to spend money buying clothes
3. My mother just learned to sew.

Or if you prefer to read this in Chinese and see whether we got the translation right, here goes:

A同学穿了一件新衣服,B同学问A:“你买了一件新衣服啊?”
A同学说:“不是买的,是我妈妈亲手帮我缝的,你觉得漂亮吗?”
B同学说:“漂亮极了,我不知道你妈妈还会缝制衣服呢!”

问题:A同学接下来会说什么?

选项:
1. 我妈妈一有空就帮我缝衣服
2. 我妈妈不喜欢花钱买衣服
3. 我妈妈刚刚开始学缝制衣

So how, parents?

If you can’t get the answer straightaway (we couldn’t, and we just translated the whole damn q&a for you), how do you think a 12-year-old kid will fare?

Don’t ask us, we don’t know the answer (PSLE still ongoing lah).

But we know that some parents have slammed the question as “ridiculous”, “too difficult” and “doesn’t make sense lor”.

Other parents say this has got nothing to do with your ability to listen and understand, which is the whole purpose of the “listening comprehension” test.

The Singapore Examinations and Assessment Board (SEAB) has said that the question is a “rejoinder question” – a new type of question that has been included in this year’s PSLE Chinese Listening Comprehension.

Students are supposed to “choose the most appropriate response to complete a dialogue”.

A SEAB spokesman said:

“Candidates have to give an appropriate answer to the question based on the conversation’s background information, and the words, phrasing and tone used in the conversation. A particular option may seem correct on its own, but if we combine it with the conversation’s cause and effect, the option may not be the right one.”

So parents, still catch no ball?

What’s your “most appropriate response” to that?

 

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