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Epic Battle between Ho Ching and Lee Hsien Yang for the Presidency?

The Istana could soon be the next battleground for the Lee Family Feud.

Now that Ho Ching has retired as Temasek Holdings CEO and moved on to a chairman role in the company, there is speculation that she could contest the next Presidential Election.

The next PE must be held by 2023, and incumbent Mdm Halimah Yacob will no longer have the benefit of having a reserved election in which only Malay-certified candidates can run.

68-year-old Ho, who is the wife of current prime minister Lee Hsien Loong.

Political watchers and analysts have also speculated that Lee Hsien Yang, PM Lee’s younger brother, could toss his hat in the ring.

The 64-year-old Progress Singapore Party member refused to stand in General Election 2020, stating that “Singapore doesn’t need another Lee”.

However, he had apparently been playing a pivotal role for the PSP in the lead-up to the election.

Both Ho and Lee meet the existing private sector requirements to run for president.

The Lee Family Feud, which has been simmering publicly for some 5 years now, involved the demolition of the late Lee Kuan Yew’s 38 Oxley Road home.

On one side of the dispute stands PM Lee, who believes that the government has the right to decide whether or not to tear down the house.

On the other stands Lee Hsien Yang and the youngest Lee sibling, Dr Lee Wei Ling, who say their father’s will stated the house should eventually be demolished after his death.

The younger Lees have accused PM Lee of wanting to preserve the house to build his own political capital, saying that his “popularity is inextricably linked to Lee Kuan Yew’s legacy”.

Since the Lee Family Feud erupted, Lee Hsien Yang’s family has come under much heat.

His wife, lawyer Lee Suet Fern, was suspended from practicing law for 15 months in 2020, after a court found her guilty of misconduct in the handling of Lee Kuan Yew’s will.

Lee’s son, Li Shengwu, was fined S$15,000 after he was found guilty of contempt of court for a private Facebook post in which he called the court “pliant”.

 

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